Money for Nothing

“In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”  We’ve all heard this before.  Anytime I do, I think immediately of Brad Pitt in the movie Meet Joe Black.  He plays a personified version of death – Joe Black – who comes to take the life of Anthony Hopkins’ character.  After taking an interest in Hopkins and his daughter, he decides to pardon him from death in exchange for a glimpse into what life is like for the living.  In one scene, someone says to Black that nothing is… [read more]
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Proof That Saving at the Last Minute Won’t Save Your Retirement

(from Robert Powell’s Marketwatch column dated 3/22/2016.  Click here for the original post.  Robert is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a MarketWatch premium newsletter.  You can follow Robert on Twitter @RJPIII.)  Most American workers think they need to save a big—perhaps unmanageable—chunk of their income to live comfortably in retirement. They may be right. But waiting until they are older to save more money won’t save their retirement. These are among the findings of the 2016 Retirement Confidence Survey released today by the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and Greenwald and Associates. On… [read more]
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Should We Invest Differently?

“With all the volatility in the market these days, and so much uncertainty, should we approach investing differently?” It was a question posed by a client, unsettled by current political and economic events, and concerned that his planned path to retirement might not be as smooth as he’d hoped.   Last fall’s drop in the US and overseas markets followed by choppy returns over the winter had left him worried.  Should he approach investing differently? Investing has certainly changed over his lifetime, so it was a reasonable question. Fifty years ago, you could invest in the… [read more]
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It Rain Tomorrow

No, the title of this blog is not a typo.  It’s an example of a not so subtle difference between futured and futureless languages.  Keith Chen is a professor in behavioral economics at the Anderson School of Management at UCLA.  More importantly to his work, perhaps, is his upbringing as an American of Chinese descent, growing up in the Midwest speaking both English and Mandarin on a daily basis. He started noticing differences in how the two languages operated early on in life.  The example he gives in his TED Talk which has received [read more]
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The Art of the Deal

Usually when financial advisors talk about saving, we’re talking about the effort to put away money for the future.  That kind of saving is paramount to the ongoing success of your financial plan, but we must admit it’s not always fun.  Today we’re talking about a different kind of saving.  The kind that always feels great – getting a bargain on what you buy. While I’m certainly not a candidate for Extreme Couponing, I do love to find a deal and have been known to put my husband through more than his fair share… [read more]
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