Pulling the Plug on Cable

My earliest memory of putting a long term financial plan together is around age 10. Of course, long term was about 6 months, but I planned, saved and eventually purchased a 13” black and white Sanyo television with bunny ears (I’ll explain black & white, bunny ears and small TVs that don’t hang on walls to any young blog readers another time). I think my parents were shocked. They had agreed that I could have a TV if I saved enough on my own, but never thought I’d make it past a baseball card shop… [read more]
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Are You Stuck in Your Comfort Zone?

I’m a first born, a CPA – a poster child for conformity. I like to know what comes next (No surprise that I chose financial planning as a career!) and want a high level of confidence that I’ll be successful before attempting something. People like me create checklists and follow routines. Routines help us deal with the chaos and complexities of daily life. They allow us to be faster and more efficient, but they can also cause us to become stale, and bind our thinking. As we get older, psychologists say we have a tendency… [read more]
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There is No Such Thing as Information Overload

(from Shane Parrish’s Farnam Street blog dated 6/30/2013. Click here for the original post. Shane created Farnam Street to help “organize, connect and pontificate on some of what I’m learning”.  The Ottawa, Ontario native’s blog is quickly becoming a favorite among journalists, senior executives and other thought leaders across a wide variety of industries.  Check out www.farnamstreetblog.com)   “To thrive amid unprecedented amounts of novelty, we must shift from being mere seekers of the new to being connoisseurs of it.” — Winifred Gallagher, writing in New: Understanding Our Need for Novelty and Change to… [read more]
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Will Your Financial Values Outlive You?

For most people, estate planning is easily avoided.  Thinking about our untimely demise is no fun, and trying to decide how to divide our assets and who will care for our children are questions that can be difficult to answer and so procrastination wins.  Finally making these decisions and drafting your documents does not mean you have completed your estate planning.  Having your assets distributed according to your wishes, and with the same care that you would take, is not something you can take for granted.  Creating a trust can be the first step in [read more]
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How Long Will I Live?

One of the most crucial decisions in a financial plan is determining a longevity factor, which is a gentler, more clinical way of saying picking a date when someone might die. The risks involved are clear. Assume too short a life span and face increased risk of running out of money before you run out of life. Plan too long a life span and you might be short changing yourself the ability to enjoy what you’ve earned to the fullest. When boiled down to its simplest level, it is the initial, core question of any… [read more]
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